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The English Beam Engine

The English Beam Engine. These sculptures built by Graham Sweet have a degree of artistic license - as the real machines do not continuously emit steam as portrayed, neither do they rust readily.
3.5 meter tall rustlite beamengine on display at IDW 1997 - business design centre London.
Rustlite / polystyrene beam engine prop.


Graham Sweet : Sculptor

Graham Sweet became fascinated with the idea of building the beam engine sculpture after seeing one in the local industrial museum in his home city of Cardiff.


History

The English Beam Engine was invented in England at the beginning of the 18th century and originally used for pumping water out of the Cornish tin mines. A fly wheel was later added to the original design and the engine came into popular use throughout Great Britain during the Industrial Revolution, particularly in the cotton mills of the Midlands and to pump water supplies around the cities. The engines were made in England and exported all over the world.
Rustlite Beam Engine on display in at euroshop 96
Rustlite Beam Engine on display in at euroshop 96


Messe Düsseldorf: Euro Shop 96

These images are of the 5 meter high beam engine, commissioned by the Messe Duseldorph for the main entrance of Euro Shop 96. The beam engine has full movement, as well as synchronized steam and sound.

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